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IMA > 2023 > November
MOU NGC

NGC JOINS IMA IN THE BID TO SAVE CARLI BAY MANGROVE

The National Gas Company of Trinidad and Tobago Limited (NGC) is joining the effort to stem the decline in mangrove health in Trinidad and Tobago. This week, the company signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) with the Institute of Marine Affairs (IMA), to implement a Mangrove Rehabilitation Project in the Carli Bay/Point Lisas area. This collaboration will promote the restoration and protection of the mangroves in a region that plays a critical role in the country’s environmental and economic landscape. Once characterised by a continuous wetland, the Couva/Carli Bay area has seen its wetland ecosystem fragment into the Couva River/Lisas Bay mangrove forest, the...

IMA & CARIRI Collaborate to Promote Caribbean Growth and Development

Port of Spain The Institute of Marine Affairs (IMA) and the Caribbean Industrial Research Institute (CARIRI) pool their institutional talent, resources, and technical expertise to support and promote economic growth and development in Trinidad and Tobago and the Caribbean.  Both entities solidified this commitment via the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) at CARIRI’s head office located at the St. Augustine campus of The University of the West Indies (UWI) on November 16th., 2023.  Dr Ava Maxam, Director IMA, and Mr. Hans-Erich Schulz, Chief Executive Officer CARIRI signing Memorandum of Understanding With Research and Development (R&D) at the core of the entities’ mandate, the IMA,...

BULLETIN: Suspected Harmful­ Algal Bloom around Tobago

Over the last few days, the Institute of Affairs (IMA) has received reports of fish kills at four sites along Tobago’s Atlantic coast – Delaford Bay, Roxborough, Lambeau Beach and on Flying Reef along Tobago’s south coast. Dead marine life was observed along beaches and in the water, mainly consisting of reef fish species such as parrotfish, snapper, butterflyfish, trumpetfish and other species including eels and octopuses. Simultaneously, reports of a possible “red tide” were reported in the same areas over the weekend. Divers observed large pockets of warm, reddish water extending to 50 feet along the Atlantic coast. This may be indicative of...

World Tsunami Awareness Day 2023: Fighting Inequality for a Resilient Future

By Christopher Alexis, Oceanography & Coastal Processes Department Annually, the 5th November is celebrated as World Tsunami Awareness Day (WTAD). Events, activities and drills are organised globally, as a reminder of the ever-present threat of tsunamis. This is especially important where the frequency and intensity of natural disasters are increasing and impacting coastal communities. The theme of WTAD 2023 is “Fighting Inequality for a Resilient Future”.  A Global Call to Action The United Nations highlights the global need for preparedness, such as early warning systems and disaster risk reduction strategies. Tsunamis may be caused by an underwater earthquake, landslide, or volcanic eruption and on rare occasions, by...

Fashion Industry Hidden Secrets that Adversely Impacts our Ocean

By Tershyan Russell, OJT Library Assistant Did you know that clothing often poses a threat to the ocean? No?  Think a bit! Clothing is often part of one’s identity. It represents unique lifestyle, preferences, and it gives an indication of the kind of weather most commonplace in the areas where we live. Clothing can also give insight into how environmentally sensitive a community is.   More and more scientists are finding bits and remains of fabric in places of the marine environment where no humans live. According to CP3 Concordia (2023), the fashion industry, especially ‘fast fashion’, uses cheap, toxic textile dyes and synthetic fabrics in...