Hotline
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. In consequat dignissim interdum, quis bibendum.
call us 1-677-124-44227
test@ima.gov.tt"
follow us
IMA > Life Along the Seashore of Trinidad and Tobago
Red Mangrove

Red Mangrove

Scientific name: Rhizophora mangle Photo Courtesy: https://www.uusc.org/ Mangroves specialize in land reclamation. They are ‘pioneer’ plants in coastal mudflats and create land out of the void. They are virtually unique in their ability to live with their roots submerged in saltwater. Red mangrove is the most dominant species seen by the casual observer, as it grows closest to the coast. Its intricate prop-root system provides support to the tree in mud and slows water circulation to encourage deposition of silt, so that the mangrove gradually extends seaward. You may also like [smart_post_show id="19584"] ...

Fat Pork

Fat Pork

Scientific name: Chrysobalanus icaco Photo Courtesy: https://growtrinbago.agriculture.gov.tt/ A highly salt tolerant evergreen shrub or small tree that can grow up to 2 m along the coast and taller inland. Its alternate leaf blades are rounded, pointed, or slightly notched at the apex, and have a glossy texture. The flowers are small greenish white. The edible fruit is nearly round, pink, whitish, or dark-purple. Its unique flavour, fleshy consistency, and thin skin make it a suitable choice for jams and jellies. The seeds can be roasted and eaten for their almond-like flavour or crushed and added to the jelly. Flowers and fruits are produced throughout the year. You...

Seagrapes

Seagrapes

Scientific name: Coccoloba uvifera Photo Courtesy: https://www.tcpalm.com/ Seagrape is a common seaside plant in Trinidad and Tobago and occurs naturally in all of Central America and throughout the Caribbean. It is highly salt tolerant and also grows equally well inland. Seagrape act as a continuous sand trap and dense stands can be an effective windbreak. On exposed shores it grows as a sprawling shrub but in more sheltered areas it can reach 15 m. The leaves are rounded, smooth, with prominent reddish veins, and up to 20 cm in diameter. Throughout the year leaf drop is constant and fallen leaves take a long time to decay....

Indian Almond Tree

Indian Almond Tree

Scientific name: Terminalia catappa Introduced from Malaysia and the East Indies, this tree is found in many Caribbean islands. Since it can withstand drought, it is common on sandy shores and makes an ideal shade tree, growing to 15 m. The leaves are alternate, with a leathery texture, glossy and dark green in colour. Leaves are shed periodically, turning bright red prior to detachment. The flowers are small, white, and grow in axillary spikes. The edible fruits are oval and green. Along the coast well above the high water mark, these trees often mix with shrubs creating a forest-like environment You may also like [smart_post_show id="19584"] ...

Donkey Eye

Donkey Eye

Scientific name: Mucuna sloanei The brown seed known as ‘Donkey eye’ begins life in inland forests borne on a climbing vine with bright yellow flowers, which overgrows other vegetation. The plant produces seed pods about 18 cm (7 in.) long. If the overgrown tree is along a stream bank, the floating seeds may find their way into rivers and get deposited along the coast by the waves and currents.15 Finding Donkey Eye seeds on the beaches of the east and south coast of Trinidad is a regular occurrence and generations of children have used them to prank others as the seeds emit heat when rubbed...

White encrusting zoanthid

White encrusting zoanthid

Science name: Palythoa caribaeorum (Duchassaing and Michelotti) Colonies of brownish-white fleshy polyps with short, stout tentacles grow in thick mats along rocky shorelines. In reef flats and tide pools areas they can withstand a few hours of being exposed to air during low tide. Tentacles curl in and retract and polyps secrete mucus to prevent drying out and predation.7, 8 Colonies can be seen on reef flats and in shallow-water reef communities in both Trinidad and Tobago. Care should be taken when wading to avoid stepping on these slippery mats. You may also like [smart_post_show id="19584"] ...

West Indian star snail

West Indian star snail

Science name: Lithopoma tectum (lightfoot) A West Indian star snail with its high conical spire makes a portable home for the Orange-claw hermit crab Calcinus tibicen Herbst. The shell is a vertical spiral with knobs and raised vertical ridges, the operculum is white. Like other snails, they have two sensory antennae and two eyes on short stalks. They are taller than they are wide and can grow up to an inch tall. Often encrusted with other organisms, like Coralline Algae. You may also like [smart_post_show id="19584"] ...

West Indian murex

West Indian murex

Science name: Chicoreus brevifrons A carnivorous sea snail with distinct spines that feeds on oysters and clams. The shell of C. brevifrons is relatively elongate, and has a typical muricid outline. Three axial varices are present along its body whorl, and they are ornamented by characteristic expanded hollow spines. It also presents flat spiral cords in the interspaces of its surface. The anterior canal is well-developed, akin to several other Muricidae snails. You may also like [smart_post_show id="19584"] ...

Sea fan

Sea fan

Science name: Gorgonia The dried-out cream-coloured skeleton of Sea Fans seen in the strandline on beaches does no justice to the beauty of live colonies of this ‘soft coral’ of the reefs. Soft corals, referred to as gorgonians, lack a hard, rigid, permanent skeleton. They attach to the substrate by a root-like holdfast and are able to flex and sway in the current. As the name suggests, the Sea Fan is compressed in the plane of a fan with interconnected ‘net-like’ branching, and ranges from purple to yellow in colour. They filter feed by capturing plankton from the water column as the “fan” is usually oriented...