Taking too long? Close loading screen.
Hotline
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. In consequat dignissim interdum, quis bibendum.
call us 1-677-124-44227
test@ima.gov.tt"
follow us
IMA > News (Page 2)

Marine Pollution: The Environmental and Economic Benefits of Recycling

Alicia C. Barrie, On the Job Trainee, Institute of Marine Affairs Over the years, Trinidad and Tobago has produced increasing amounts of Municipal Solid Waste, with high amounts of single-use plastics entering our marine ecosystem. Our high level of mismanaged pollution clutters the landscapes, degrades the overall health and viability of our fragile marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and harms marine animals that become entangled in, suffocated by, or ingest these plastics. As citizens, we have grown accustomed to discarding our garbage wherever we go, whether it be on the beach, in rivers, or on the roadside. Our polluting habits introduce toxins, foul odours and other...

Promoting Marine and Coastal Awareness

Lorraine Barrow, Institute of Marine Affairs Our coasts and ocean are not only places that we go to rest and relax, and heal, but they are lifelines to island states.  These are places for most of our trade and economic activities.  An IDB study revealed that in 2015, 81% of our Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was generated from our wider coastal zone that extends 200 nautical miles to our Exclusive Economic Zone.  Our coastal and marine resources are vital since they support our livelihoods, supply jobs in the energy and tourism sectors and provide us with food.  How many of us are aware of the significant connection between our marine resources and our daily lives. ...

Carnival of the Sea

Lester W. Doodnath, Institute of Marine Affairs The people of Trinidad and Tobago share a very special connection with our coastal and marine environment. Our coastal and marine environments provide us with numerous ecosystem services including spaces for rest and recreation. Our connection is realised in our wide and varied use of the resource for entertainment, built development, commercial/recreational fishing and petroleum exploitation to list but a few. Our seas and coastlines also serve as inspiration for our artistic and cultural expressions. Nowhere is this demonstrated more, than at the annual carnival celebrations. In 2018 alone, there were Seatopia (Theatrical Kidz) and Scarlet Ibis, Do Not Eat Ah Food (Lee Poy-Moko Jumbie Mas)...

State of the Marine Environment Trinidad and Tobago 2016

The report provides a scientifically grounded understanding of the condition of Trinidad and Tobago’s coastal and marine ecosystems, habitats and species which are extremely important for this country’s development and sustainability. It also details how the status of these resources have been, and are being affected by the range of natural and human pressures to which they are subjected such as land-based pollution and impacts from climate change.  The degradation of coastal and marine ecosystems (coral reefs, mangrove swamps, seagrass beds, beaches), mainly from anthropogenic impacts such as pollution has made them more vulnerable to impacts from climate change, and other emerging issues like impacts from invasive alien species (IAS) and Sargassum blooms. Within the...

Twenty Thousand Microplastics in the Sea

Prepared by Attish Kanhai, Research Officer Institute of Marine Affairs First published in 1870, Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea tells the story of something strange happening in the ocean. A sea beast that no one had ever seen before was attacking ships in the ocean. None of the sea folk at the time had any idea what this strange beast might be. An expedition ship, the Abraham Lincoln, sets sail in search of this unknown creature. After some time the Lincoln is attacked by the fearsome sea beast only for the crew to discover that this is no sea beast at all but something manmade yet equally fearsome, a submarine....

The Untold Story of Saharan Dust

by Attish Kanhai, Research OfficerInstitute of Marine Affairs As the tiny boat streaked across the Gulf of Paria during the early hours of a Monday morning, the sky seemed to melt into the ocean. The horizon disappeared as sea and sky faded into one never-ending blue curtain. Not surprising I thought, as I dreaded the day ahead. The weather forecast had predicted extreme plumes of Saharan dust over the next few days and warned allergy sufferers to take the appropriate measures. As I entered into the mangrove forest the waterworks started, runny nose, itchy eyes and sore throat. With a sigh I accepted my...

World Wetlands and Climate Change

Once considered spaces and areas where refuse should be dumped, wetlands are now recognised integral components of marine and terrestrial environments and are also valued as sources of economic contribution to the sustainable development of many economies. The Institute of Marine Affairs (IMA) joins the Government of Republic of Trinidad and Tobago and the Global Community in observing World Wetlands Day 2019.  The theme this year, World Wetlands and Climate Change, makes a ‘clarion’ call for all of us to recognise and act on carrying out activities that would conserve our wetlands. The Library is pleased to share the following link, which provides access to download/view/read a power-point presentation on World Wetlands Day...

Our Wetlands: Our Defence

by Dr. Rahanna Juman Deputy Director or Research The frequency of disasters worldwide has more than doubled in just 35 years; and 90% of these disasters are water related. More and more, climate change is driving weather-related hazards such as flooding and hurricanes. This pattern is already having a significant impact on Small Island Developing States in the Caribbean; and it’s unlikely to get any better. The most we can do is to develop strategies to manage the impacts of climate change and reduce carbon emissions and this is where wetlands come into their own importance. In the Caribbean Region, it is estimated that changes in...

IMA presents Marine Biology Award to UWI Graduate

On Thursday 3rd January 2019, the Institute of Marine Affairs (IMA) presented University of the West Indies (St. Augustine Campus) Graduate, Ms. Hannah Lochan, with the IMA – Richard Laydoo Memorial Prize for 2017 – 2018. IMA’s Director, Dr. Ahmad Khan delivered   remarks during the short award presentation at the IMA’s head office on Hilltop Lane Chagaramas  saying “We acknowledge and reward the outstanding academic performance, which  would have been rooted in dedication, hard work and a desire to excel. Ms. Lochan exemplified those ideals by attaining the best academic performance in Marine Biology.”  He added “This donation of the awards reflect our core values of excellence, collaboration and innovation and the Institute’s unwavering support...

Community Research Symposium “Transforming Tobago: Understanding and Conserving our Natural Ecosystems.”

The Institute of Marine Affairs (IMA) hosted its 5th Community Research Symposium, in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) on Monday 29th and Tuesday 30th October 2018. Addressing the communities of Betsy’s Hope, and Scarborough and environs over the 2 two-day period, the IMA, the Improving Forest and Protected Area Management in Trinidad and Tobago Project (IFPAMTT), and other stakeholders shared details about research conducted by the respective organizations on coastal and marine related issues such as beach/coastal erosion, The invasive Lionfish, Sargassum, and the status of coral reefs and the importance of other protected areas. In addition to...