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IMA > Updates B&ERP

The Great Conservation Story Leatherback Turtle Conservation in Trinidad and Tobago: Community and Conservation

This is the third and final part of a three-part series on the Great Conservation of the Leatherback Turtle in Trinidad and Tobago. We last learnt how Nature Seekers started in 1990 with the assistance of the Forestry’s Wildlife Section. Since then, Nature Seekers has continued to grow as a Non-governmental organization (NGO) in membership and recognition both here and abroad. Nature Seekers has been recognised for their great work and contribution to protecting the leatherback turtles, and as an excellent example of how education and a love for these charismatic creatures can change people’s perspective on how to wisely use their natural resources. The...

The Great Conservation Story of the Leatherback Turtle in Trinidad and Tobago: Collaboration, Community and Conservation

It is 10 pm and the moonlight is beaming in the horizon and the waves are crashing onto the shores of the North East Coast of Trinidad. There in the distance, what looks like a rock in the water, is not a rock at all but an ancient gentle giant of the sea – a female leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea)- slowly making her way up the beach to begin digging a hole to lay her eggs. As this majestic creature lays her eggs, I will continue the great conservation story about the leatherback turtle in Trinidad and Tobago. As mentioned in Part One of...

Research-Scientist-IMA 16:9

Marine Science Contributions to a Sustainable Future from our Female Scientists at the IMA

In an interview with the IMA, Ms. Alison Clausen of the Paris Office of the United Nations Educational Scientific Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), noted that the UN is creating a framework to galvanise global support for championing the health of our oceans. Ms. Clausen states that science has for decades documented the demise of our oceans but now the global scientific community must use science to provide solutions – and that scientific community includes women....

Salybia Beach

UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development 2021–2030
Opportunities for Trinidad and Tobago

By Dr. Anjani Ganase, Coral Reef Ecologist Institute of Marine Affairs Our ocean is the foundation for life, the regulator of our climate and a major source of food, income and cultural significance. Yet, the first world assessment report (2016) of our oceans concluded that much of the world’s marine ecosystems have become degraded over the last fifty years owing to our poor management of the ocean ecosystems. In light of this, UNESCO has declared a Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development in 2021 – 2030 recognising the urgent need to curb and even reverse the considerable degradation that the ocean ecosystems have suffered as...

Wetland and Water

In Commemoration of World Wetland Day 2021 Prepared by Rahanna JumanInstitute of Marine Affairs We are in a growing water crisis that threatens people and our planet.  Water use has increased six fold over the past century and is rising by about 1% a year. We use more water than nature can replenish, and are destroying the ecosystems that water and all our life depend on most- wetlands. Rincon Lagoon Water covers about 70% of our planet, so we think that it is plentiful. However, freshwater—the stuff we drink and irrigate our farms with—is incredibly rare. Only 3% of the world’s water is freshwater, and two-thirds of that...

UN Decade on Biodiversity (2011-2020) and Our Oceans: Where are we?

In 2010, the United Nations (UN) General Assembly declared the period 2011-2020, as the UN Decade on Biodiversity to promote the implementation of a strategic plan on biodiversity, and its overall vision of living in harmony with nature. The goal was to mainstream and integrate biodiversity conservation in all sectoral plans and policies on a global scale. As we have come to the end of the Decade of Biodiversity, what does this mean for Trinidad and Tobago? It means that Legislative and Policy Reform is now imperative for the following: *Protection of critical fish nursery habitats *Restoration of degraded coastal areas *Conservation of marine ecosystems (coral...

Biodiversity matters, Even worms!

By Attish Kanhai, Research OfficerInstitute of Marine Affairs C. elegans is a transparent nematode worm 1 millimetre long with no eyes that eats bacteria. It is an organism the vast majority of human beings will probably never interact with but in the unlikely event that you do, its unremarkable appearance will probably not make an impression in your mind. Beauty as they say, is in the eyes of the beholder, and discovery is in the mind of the adventurer. C elegans, in the world of genetic biology, is an A-list celebrity.  It is Rihanna and Beyonce combined. The impact of these creatures is undeniable. Despite their...

Rethinking the Oceans: Transitioning to the Blue Economy

Farahnaz N. Solomon (PhD)Research Officer , Institute of Marine Affairs “There are more opportunities in the ocean than we can fathom”. Oceans cover 72% of the Earth’s surface. They support life by generating oxygen, absorbing carbon dioxide, recycling nutrients and regulating global climate and temperature. Oceans are important for fisheries, transport, and tourism – all traditional sectors of the Blue Economy. Highlighted at the 2012 Rio +20 Conference, the Blue Economy can be defined as 'the sustainable use of ocean resources for economic growth, improved livelihoods and jobs, while preserving the health of the marine and coastal environment'(1). Using the sea for economic gain is not a...

Living with Nature

Prepared byDr Anjani Ganase, Coral Reef Ecologist,Institute of Marine Affairs Around Trinidad and Tobago, there are Caribbean and Atlantic coasts. Our islands’ location along the edge of the South American shelf also provides exceptionally rich and diverse flora and fauna. Within the boundaries of our relatively small islands, the landscapes support wetlands, rainforests, savannahs, rivers and over 500 km of coasts. Our Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) extends over an area which is 15 times the combined land mass (approximately 5000 km2 of land). The ocean biome extends from sandy and rocky shores to coral reefs, offshore islands, sandy seafloor, the open ocean and mysterious unknown deep-sea...