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Marin Tobago team

The restoration journey continues, Project MARIN proceeds for another five years.  

Media release: September 11, 2023  The MARIN Tobago pilot brings needed attention to endangered coral reefs and seagrass meadows. The report on the pilot phase indicates the way forward for the next five years.   The Institute of Marine Affairs’ coral and seagrass restoration project, MARIN, has passed through a successful pilot phase and is now set to enter the main phase with support from bpTT.  Based on the success of the pilot project, bpTT has committed US$1 million in grant funding to support a 5-year work programme with the IMA to further their work in coral reef and seagrass restoration across Tobago, working in partnership with NGOs,...

Megafauna

Why Size Matters – How the Loss of the Ocean’s Megafauna is Affecting Our Ecosystems

Heracles, better known by his Roman name Hercules, is one of the most famous characters of Greek mythology. An illegitimate child of the Greek God Zeus, Heracles was the source of jealousy for Zeus’s legitimate wife Hera, hence his mother's naming him Heracles, which translates to “Hera’s glory”. Hera remained unmoved and in the red mist of anger, tricked Heracles into killing his wife and children, a crime for which his punishment became known as the 12 labours of Heracles.  Heracles’ 12 labours, were in essence, ridding the Greek universe of some of its most fearsome creatures such as lions, hydras, boars and bulls. I...

Dr Ava Maxam - Director, IMA

Welcome aboard, Dr. Ava Maxam, our newly appointed Director!

Dr. Ava Maxam has been appointed as the Director of the Institute of Marine Affairs with effect from September 4th, 2023. She brings extensive technical and management experience to the Institute with a particular focus in the areas of coastal and environmental management, sustainable development and spatial business solutions. A strong advocate for data-driven decision-making, Dr Maxam leverages Geographic information Systems (GIS) to create models, tools, and policies for modern resource management. She specialises in developing GIS-based analytical and decision-support systems that empower governments, civil society, and the private sector, which in turn strengthens their resilience to the impacts of natural and man-made hazards including...

Red Mangrove

Red Mangrove

Scientific name: Rhizophora mangle Photo Courtesy: https://www.uusc.org/ Mangroves specialize in land reclamation. They are ‘pioneer’ plants in coastal mudflats and create land out of the void. They are virtually unique in their ability to live with their roots submerged in saltwater. Red mangrove is the most dominant species seen by the casual observer, as it grows closest to the coast. Its intricate prop-root system provides support to the tree in mud and slows water circulation to encourage deposition of silt, so that the mangrove gradually extends seaward. You may also like [smart_post_show id="19584"] ...

Fat Pork

Fat Pork

Scientific name: Chrysobalanus icaco Photo Courtesy: https://growtrinbago.agriculture.gov.tt/ A highly salt tolerant evergreen shrub or small tree that can grow up to 2 m along the coast and taller inland. Its alternate leaf blades are rounded, pointed, or slightly notched at the apex, and have a glossy texture. The flowers are small greenish white. The edible fruit is nearly round, pink, whitish, or dark-purple. Its unique flavour, fleshy consistency, and thin skin make it a suitable choice for jams and jellies. The seeds can be roasted and eaten for their almond-like flavour or crushed and added to the jelly. Flowers and fruits are produced throughout the year. You...

Seagrapes

Seagrapes

Scientific name: Coccoloba uvifera Photo Courtesy: https://www.tcpalm.com/ Seagrape is a common seaside plant in Trinidad and Tobago and occurs naturally in all of Central America and throughout the Caribbean. It is highly salt tolerant and also grows equally well inland. Seagrape act as a continuous sand trap and dense stands can be an effective windbreak. On exposed shores it grows as a sprawling shrub but in more sheltered areas it can reach 15 m. The leaves are rounded, smooth, with prominent reddish veins, and up to 20 cm in diameter. Throughout the year leaf drop is constant and fallen leaves take a long time to decay....

Indian Almond Tree

Indian Almond Tree

Scientific name: Terminalia catappa Introduced from Malaysia and the East Indies, this tree is found in many Caribbean islands. Since it can withstand drought, it is common on sandy shores and makes an ideal shade tree, growing to 15 m. The leaves are alternate, with a leathery texture, glossy and dark green in colour. Leaves are shed periodically, turning bright red prior to detachment. The flowers are small, white, and grow in axillary spikes. The edible fruits are oval and green. Along the coast well above the high water mark, these trees often mix with shrubs creating a forest-like environment You may also like [smart_post_show id="19584"] ...

Dr Anjani Ganase monitoring coral reefs - Institute of Marine Affairs

Tides Are Changing

By  Ruqayyah Thompson, Research Officer. International days are a powerful advocacy tool used to raise awareness on matters of public concern, garner political support and resources to address global problems as well as to celebrate humanity’s achievements. This month, we join with the global community to recognise World Oceans Day on June 8th under the theme, “Planet Ocean: Tides Are Changing”. The ocean covers over 70% of the Earth’s surface and forms 95% of the biosphere, the part of the Earth where life exists. It produces at least 50% of the world’s oxygen and is a main source of protein for over a billion people. The...